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Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture: Past Present and Future (Acta Horticulturae 1124)
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Panis, B
xi+114p
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Weight :  0 gms
Binding :  Hard Bound
Height :  0 cm
Width :  0 cm
Imprint :  I S H S-Astral
Year :  2020
 

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ISBN: 9789388982511
Status: LATEST(In Stock) 
Price: Rs 1495.00  

Increased adoption of GMOs across horticulture has the potential to deliver a number of benefits to society, including reduced chemical usage, with flow-on health and environmental benefits, improved drought resistance, reducing use of valuable water supplies and ensuring food security in time of drought, greater availability of high quality horticultural produce to consumers, conferring food security to vulnerable population and delivering economic and health benefits to consumers, increased productivity, helping to secure the economic future for horticultural producers around the world, improved nutrition through biofortification, and adding nutrients and vitamins to staple crops of people suffering from malnutrition in developing countries. It is a compendium of fifteen chapters written by noted experts in the field. It will be an essential to horticulturists, students, teachers, researchers as well as all those interested in GMOs in horticulture.

LIST OF CONTENTS Foreword LLPiirssettf aoocff eca ounth teonrsts vvixiiixiii
Plenary session
GM crops: not the science but the regulatory policy is the problem 1 M. Van Montagu
The ‘Rainbow’ papaya experience 11 D. Gonsalves
GMOs in horticulture: past, present and future
Impacts of biotechnology on biodiversity and benefits of GMOs to growers 19 J.E. Carpenter
GM crops and damage to country image: much ado about nothing? 23 J.G. Knight
GHeanwea ifil ow from commercial transgenic papaya fields into feral populations in 33 R. Manshardt, D. Bishaw, K. Pitz and C.N. Stewart, Jr.
New developments in GMO science – from gene function to application 41 H. Lütken, N. Kodahl and R. Müller
GbaMnOasn ain horticulture – exciting opportunities or a dead end? A case study on 49 B. Panis
Regulation and biosafety
Regulatory and biosafety considerations for bioengineered crop plants 59 J. Stein
pBeiortsepcehcntiovleo gy and biosafety activities at OECD – a policy development 63 P. Kearns, T. Nikaido, B. Dagallier and M. Hosokawa
Aanred wGMhaOts h saapfpee tnos ewaht?e nC yuorrue enxtc, einedad tehqeuma te requirements for feeding studies 69 J.A. Carman
Assessing the safety of genetically modified foods – from science to regulation 75 L.J. Graf
x
GMOs and the consumer
Public attitudes towards biotechnology 81 C. Cormick
Acceptance of disease-resistant GM rootstocks for non-GM fruit 91 N. Mitter and M. Gleeson
The nutritional status of GMOs 97 T.C. Vrain
Policy paper
Exploitation and progress of GMOs – past, present and future, opportunities or a dead end? exciting 101

B. Panis

   

  Plant Biotechnology
Genetics And Plant Breeding
Horticulture
 
   

   
   

  B Panis
 
   

  Bioengineered
Crop
Plant
commercial
Trangenic
Papaya
Biosafety
crops
inviromnetal
risk
Banana
 
   
 
 
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Genetically Modified Organisms in Horticulture: Past Present and Future (Acta Horticulturae 1124)

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